Life behind the Iron Curtain

Source: The New Yorker When Germany invaded Poland, on September 1, 1939, the date that W. H. Auden used for his famous poem—“I and the public know / What all schoolchildren learn, / Those to whom evil is done / Do evil in return”—Poland had commitments in hand from France and Britain to come to its aid if its independence was threatened. In Warsaw, in … Continue reading Life behind the Iron Curtain

The Tragedy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Hans von Dohnanyi

In January 1933, German conservatives, facing a political deadlock, engineered a way for Adolf Hitler, leader of Germany’s largest political party, to become chancellor, with a predominantly conservative cabinet. They thought he would be their “captive”—the first of many fatal illusions that eased Hitler’s path to power. Soon it was clear that his regime would eliminate all opposition and establish total control over what had … Continue reading The Tragedy of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Hans von Dohnanyi